As a new digital SLR photographer, you are looking for beginning photography tips on what camera to get and how to use it.

You’ll soon find that you’ll be overwhelmed by a lot of information too fast.

Relax!                      

Slow down and ask yourself a few questions.

Ask yourself why you want to take photos, why you want to own a dSLR camera and what you intend to do with it.

Next, read on for a few of the tips that I would suggest you take to heart.

  • Buy a camera you’ll use often
  • Keep that camera on you all the time
  • Take many photos
  • Review those photos
  • Experiment with your camera settings

These are beginning photography tips that I would suggest to new and enthusiastic digital SLR photographers.

Buy A Camera You’ll Use Often

As a photographer, I am usually asked for advice about cameras and the like. Most of the questions start out like this…

I want to buy a camera and I want to know what is the best camera I should buy…?”

I want to buy a camera and I want to know what is the best camera I should buy…?”

There is no particular answer to this but if pressed, I will recommend the cheapest digital SLR body and a general purpose lens with a large range.

The best camera anyone can buy is the camera that they will use most often! Why? Because great pictures aren’t the result of an expensive camera but the result of a creative photographer!

Keep The Camera On You All The Time

You’re a photographer now and you’ve got to prove it to yourself. Whenever you leave the house, make sure you’ve got the camera on you. Yes, it’ll be a pain, especially if it is a dSLR camera but having the camera on your person all the time will cause you to make use of it more often.

Photos don’t create themselves. You, as the photographer, are the integral role of the creation of a photograph. The more photos you take, the more refined your photos will be.

When you carry the camera on your person all the time, there are one of two results that will be experienced. You will either get sick and tired of carrying that camera or you will make use of it.

Keep in mind, however, that photo opportunities come unexpectedly and when you have your camera at the ready, you will be more inclined to take photos.

And…

Take Many Photos

… Take many photos! The more photos you take, the more experience you’ll gain. The more experience you gain, the greater the chance of your creating more of those “perfect” shots.

As you get more comfortable with the act of taking photos, you’ll be inclined to take many more.

More photos will always mean more practice. And more practice will keep your “photographic eye” open for more photographic opportunities.

If possible, try to photograph something everyday. It doesn’t matter what it is. If you search the internet, you’ll find many resources for a “PAD” or photo-a-day assignments as part of your arsenal of beginning photography tips.

Undertaking these assignments is a big responsibility but you’ll be proud of yourself for starting and finishing these assignments.

Start slowly. Take a photo a day for a week. If you like it, extend it for another week. If you don’t, stop. Take a break and then when you feel ready, start again.

Review Those Photos

Our beginning photography tips suggest that you take many photos on your way to becoming the photographer that you desire to be. In today’s world, memory and storage are cheap so you are bound to have hundreds and thousands of photos.

As an aside, I have already taken over 25,000 shots on my one year old dSLR body for my clients! That means 25,000 photos that I have to review!

I don’t suggest you take as many as these photos because you’ll be exhausted before you even start! But please do take the time to go over your photos and make notes.

You want to ensure that you are always consistent in your photography. If you read other beginning photography tips, you’ll find similar advice: taking photos is only one part of the equation. The other half of the equation is understanding and reviewing those photos!

Experiement WIth Your Camera Settings

And finally, please do experiment with your camera settings. Don’t be tempted to leave your camera on “Auto” mode and you be the camera’s shutter release finger!

You paid good money for that brand new digital SLR camera and by leaving your camera on “Auto” you are trusting “advanced digital technology” to do your creative thinking for you.

Yes, I admit that it may appear to be a daunting task to understand ALL of your camera settings but the point of learning is to take it in bite-sized chunks.

For one week, leave your camera on “Auto”. The following week, leave it on “Aperture” and take photos. And so on.

You’ll be surprised at the results.

Remember, these 5 beginning photography tips are to help you get started on being the creative photographer you’ve always wanted to be.

Love your camera. Love yourself. Love your photos.